Ike Delock

scan-197

1959 Topps

Delock won 84 games in his 11-year career. He pitched every one of those seasons for Boston, save his final year, 1963, which he spent with the Baltimore Orioles. Delock was one of the Red Sox better pitchers through the latter half of the 1950’s. He won more than 10 games three times for Boston during this period with his best year being 1958 when he went 14-8 with a 3.38 ERA. Interestingly, Delock started and worked out of the bullpen in almost every year of his career. The lone exception being 1961 when he appeared in 28 games, all of which he started.

There’s a good chance you never heard of the guy Delock listed as his favorite player when he was growing up. Detroit Tiger outfielder Barney McCosky is hardly a familiar name to anyone except the most hardcore baseball history buff. McCosky played 11 seasons for four different teams from 1939-1953. His career was interrupted by World War 2, so he did not play at all from 1942-45. He led the American League in hits and triples in 1940. You can read more about him here. The only link I can find between the two players is that Delock is from Michigan and McCosky played for the Tigers. This would make sense as far as why he was his favorite player although that is just speculation on my part.

ikedelock

A second thing that jumps out at you is that Delock, who was a pretty good pitcher, said Nellie Fox was the toughest hitter he ever faced. A Hall of Famer certainly, Fox is usually regarded as a better glove man than a hitter, but the fact of the matter is Fox hit .288 in his career and crossed the .300 mark six times in his career. It’s true, he didn’t have much pop. He hit just 35 home runs in a 19-year career, but Fox was a good enough hitter that he made Delock remember his name when he could have chosen from a plethora of talented hitters in the American League like Mickey Mantle, Yogi Berra or Al Kaline. Of course Delock did benefit from the fact that the best hitter in baseball, Ted Williams, was his teammate for almost his entire career.

Ike Delock – career stats

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